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research.image_overlay [2014/01/27 17:26]
che12@johnshopkins.edu
research.image_overlay [2019/08/07 16:01] (current)
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 **Method** **Method**
  
 +{{ :​ar_goggle.png?​240}}
 As illustrated in Figure 1, the user wears the optical seethrough goggles (Juxtopia LLC, Baltimore, MD) and a helmet that supports a compact optical tracking system (Micron tracker, Claron Technology, Toronto, CA). The first step is a registration procedure (Fig 1), in which the surgeon uses a tracked probe to touch markers that were affixed to the patient prior to the preoperative imaging. A paired point rigid registration technique computes the transformation that aligns the preoperative data (i.e., tumor outline) to the real world. ​ As illustrated in Figure 1, the user wears the optical seethrough goggles (Juxtopia LLC, Baltimore, MD) and a helmet that supports a compact optical tracking system (Micron tracker, Claron Technology, Toronto, CA). The first step is a registration procedure (Fig 1), in which the surgeon uses a tracked probe to touch markers that were affixed to the patient prior to the preoperative imaging. A paired point rigid registration technique computes the transformation that aligns the preoperative data (i.e., tumor outline) to the real world. ​
- 
-{{ ::​ar_goggle.png?​240 ​ |}} 
  
 After registration,​ the surgeon can see a registered preoperative model overlayed on the real anatomy using the optical seethrough goggles (Figure 2, which illustrates the concept with a skull model, rather than the tumor margin that would be used in an actual surgery). After registration,​ the surgeon can see a registered preoperative model overlayed on the real anatomy using the optical seethrough goggles (Figure 2, which illustrates the concept with a skull model, rather than the tumor margin that would be used in an actual surgery).
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 This is the first time that a head mounted tracking, registration and display system are integrated for surgical navigation. This would reduce the line of sight problem (because the tracker’s line-of-sight is the same as the surgeon’s),​ the difficulty in association of preoperative images, and the bulkiness that exists in the current systems. This is the first time that a head mounted tracking, registration and display system are integrated for surgical navigation. This would reduce the line of sight problem (because the tracker’s line-of-sight is the same as the surgeon’s),​ the difficulty in association of preoperative images, and the bulkiness that exists in the current systems.
  
-===== Future ​=====+**Future**
  
-*Inertial Sensing (e.g., accelerometers,​ gyroscopes) +  ​*Inertial Sensing (e.g., accelerometers,​ gyroscopes) 
-*Kalman Filter for Sensor Fusion  +  *Kalman Filter for Sensor Fusion  
-*Magnification  +  *Magnification  
-*Eye Tracking+  *Eye Tracking
  
 ===== Publications ===== ===== Publications =====
  
-  -Ehsan Azimi, Jayfus Doswell, Peter Kazanzides, ”Augmented Reality Goggles with an Integrated Tracking System for Navigation in Neurosurgery”,​ IEEE Virtual Reality 2012 +  -Ehsan Azimi, Jayfus Doswell, Peter Kazanzides, ”Augmented Reality Goggles with an Integrated Tracking System for Navigation in Neurosurgery”,​ IEEE Virtual Reality 2012 4-8 March.
-4-8 March.+
   -Praneeth Sadda, Ehsan Azimi, George Jallo, Jayfus Doswell and Peter Kazanzides, ​ “Surgical Navigation with a Head-Mounted Tracking System and Display”, Studies in health technology and informatics. Volume 184. Page 363.   -Praneeth Sadda, Ehsan Azimi, George Jallo, Jayfus Doswell and Peter Kazanzides, ​ “Surgical Navigation with a Head-Mounted Tracking System and Display”, Studies in health technology and informatics. Volume 184. Page 363.
  
research.image_overlay.1390843562.txt.gz · Last modified: 2019/08/07 16:03 (external edit)




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